MOCA Jacksonville Director Marcelle Polednik, Ph.D.


The Art of Technology

Contemporary art takes on different meanings depending on the artists defining it. But nothing could feel more current than the innovative works in Smoke and Mirrors: Sculpture and the Imaginary. Many of the objects employ technology such as a computers, electronics, and LED lights—media appropriate for this digital age. But the artists’ use of these tools does not overpower their aesthetic sensibilities or underlying messages.

MOCA Jacksonville is the first institution to exhibit Daniel Rozin’s Penguin Mirrors, an installation of 450 motorized stuffed animals scattered on the floor. As viewers approach the animals, the penguins respond and mirror their observers’ movements, either facing or turning away from their audience. The installation’s playful interactivity almost hides the complex geometry and computer robotics that drive it.

At first glance, Ken Matsubara’s Round Chair series appears to be simple glasses of water sitting atop stools. But the objects take on new dimension when viewers peer into the bottom of the glasses to find curious films whose technology defies explanation.

Even works that mimic nature, such as James Clar’s computer-projected Rain Under Lamppost and Patrick Jacobs’ fairytale portholes, are constructed with modern, man-made materials. MOCA Jacksonville invited Kathleen Vance to evolve her series Rogue Stream by creating a site-responsive installation based on the St. Johns River. After studying the river’s course, Vance recreates it in miniature—echoing every bend as water charts through the city and in the replica. Created to celebrate Cultural Fusion’s Year of the River, Vance constructs a living sculpture that poses questions about our relationship to nature.

Technology also breathes life into Project Atrium: Ian Johnston, the series’ first mechanical installation. In Fish Tales, shopping carts suspended from the top of the Atrium Gallery are covered in a giant bag that inflates and deflates, commenting on the uneasy marriage of consumption and waste. But it’s also a not-so-subtle reminder that our love affair with goods often leads to a landfill.

Artists who appropriate technology to create mind-blowing visual effects in three-dimensional forms—these exhibitions are just the latest examples of how MOCA Jacksonville brings you the art, artists, and ideas of our time.

Marcelle Polednik, PhD
Director and Chief Curator

Mission Statement

The Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville promotes the discovery, knowledge, and advancement of the art, artists, and ideas of our time.

MOCA Jacksonville, a private nonprofit visual arts educational institution and cultural resource of the University of North Florida, serves the community and its visitors through exhibitions, collections, educational programs, and publications designed to enhance an understanding and appreciation of modern and contemporary art with particular emphasis on works created from 1960 to the present.

MOCA Jacksonville is a cultural resource of and funded in part by the University of North Florida with additional funding by the City of Jacksonville; Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville; the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs; and by the generous support of our members.

MOCA Jacksonville’s website was funded through a generous grant from the Jessie Ball duPont Fund.